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Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 6:00 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Andrey L. Gonchar.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/19/2017: Hyas ursinus, or The ‘Pigeon Crab,‘ called ‘Kebukahikigani’ in Japanese, (ケブカヒキガニ) or The Russian Lyre Crab, is a family Oregoniidae/superfamily Majoidea subspecies of Hyas coarctatus. This North Western Atlantic species has found its way into colder pacific waters via arctic migration, and has been observed as far East as the North Pacific Sea Ranges, The Sea of Japan, and Shanghai. Differing from its parent taxa by the presence of two posterodorsal spines on its carapace, Pigeon Crabs are caught in fishing nets infrequently, but not rarely.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=442168
http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/bismal/e ... ew/9040288

Image
Photo Credit: Joel Sartore.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/20/2017: Minuca virens, or The Green-Banded Fiddler Crab, (formerly Uca virens) is a species of family Ocypodidae shore crab found in the Western Atlantic: from Mississippi to Vera Cruz, Mexico. Named for the Olive Green band across its 'shoulders' and rear carapace, this crab was previously synonymous with Uca rapax, leading to some taxonomic uncertainty. In 1968, the differentiation was made official by M. Salmon & S. P. Atsaides, contributing to the American Journal of Zoology.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=955273
https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/ ... 60746#null

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 4:46 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Ruei-Yi Lee.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/21/2017: Phylladiorhynchus pusillus, (Henderson, 1885) or The Australian Red Squat Lobster, is an Anomuran species of family Galatheidae ‘crab cousin’ found in Indo-Pacific waters, notably The Red Sea, Japan, China, Australia, New Zealand/New Caledonia, and many Pacific Islands. Called “Hiratsunokoshioriebi” (ヒラツノコシオリエビ) in Japanese, this squat lobster can be differentiated from its closest relative, P. integrirostris, by its distinct number of epigastric carapace spines. (It has four!)

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=378117
http://www.eol.org/pages/3118823/overview

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:55 am
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Colin Mclay, 2001.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/22/2017: Dromidiopsis richer, affectionately called “Richer’s Sponge Crab,” is a family Dromiidae sponge carrying crab species from French Polynesia, (Marquesas, Society, Austral, Tuamotu, Gambier) Pitcairn, Easter Island, and Clipperton. This sponge-associated hardpan dwell seldom reaches more than 5 mm across its carapace, and lives upwards to 60 m in depth.

The taxonomic status of Dromidiospsis richeri remains tentative, as its existence has only been verified via 2 recorded (possibly parasitized) female specimens. Though three distinctive anterolateral teeth and a dense fringe of setae behind the frontal margin differentiate it from other related species, questions as to holotype specifics still remain.

D. richer is named for deep sea crab taxonomy rockstar, Bertrand Richer de Forges of the Muséum National d'Histoire, Paris: Department of Systematics and Evolution.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=440070
http://www.eol.org/pages/12170804/overview

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 12:19 am
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: YoyoFreelance.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/23/2017: Macrophthalmus (Paramareotis) erato, or The Eastern Sentinel Crab, is a superfamily Ocypodoidea/family Macrophthalmidae species from the West-Central Pacific, namely the Southeast Asian countries of Thailand and Malaysia. (Singapore) Recognizable by its tall, sparsely setae covered eyestalks, blue carapace and chelipeds, and purple margins, M. erato inhabits tropical muddy/sandy shores and brackish, further-inland mangroves. These shore crabs exhibit some pretty bizarre fighting behaviors. While the males engage in ritual claw waving and ‘battles’ for mating selection purposes, the females of the species will actively fight each other for nest/burrow territory. These fights involve leg touching/pushing, followed by mounting and grasping.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=444963
http://www.eol.org/pages/4268552/overview

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Mon Aug 28, 2017 1:18 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: David Fenwick, APHOTOMARINE.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/25/2017: Bodotria scorpioides, (Montagu, 1804) or The Hooded Scorpion Shrimp, is a species of tiny order Cumacea crustacean, found in the East Atlantic, the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. Seldom reaching more than a few mm in length, (less than 1 cm) these family Bodotriidae sediment dwellers occasionally swim, usually to procure food or mate. Sometimes called “Comma Shrimp,” the animals in genus “Bodotria” are named for the Ancient Roman name for the Firth of Forth, an estuary of several Scottish rivers.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=110445
http://www.eol.org/pages/1022393/overview

Image
Photo Credit: "leechitse" PIXNET, 2011.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/26/2017: Demania scaberrima, The Sun Dried Coral Round Crab (also called the “Scabrous Crab”) is an Indo-Pacific family Xanthidae species found from Africa to Australia and the far Pacific. Called “Uroko-ougigani” in Japanese, (ウロコオウギガニ roughly meaning ‘Scaly Round Crab.’) this crab’s latin suffix is a double-entendre; scabrous can mean both “rough and covered with, or as if with, scabs,” OR “indecent; salacious.” The first definition being obvious, but the second alludes to the fact that these opportunistic carnivores frequently steal fish from nets! Additionally, D. scaberrima is SUPER toxic to humans and domestic animals, and has actually caused human casualties to uneducated eaters!

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=444248
http://www.eol.org/pages/4260038/overview

Image
Photo Credit: Ground Truth Trekking.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/27/2017: Elassochirus gilli, called The Pacific Red Hermit Crab, and The Common Orange Hermit, is a species of widely distributed family Paguridae species. Like both of its namesakes, this crab is extremely red-orange colored, and can typically be found hiding among the bedrock and rubble where the oceanic currents trend towards the faster side. More current = more food! As these crabs prefer shells with other living organisms, (plants, barnacles, etc.) its not surprising that some of them get one with a ‘walking’ sponge; ie, the sponge begins to grow on a shell, eventually dissolving and replacing it. The sponge then grows with the hermit crab, relieving it of the need to switch shells!

This hermit was first described in 1892 by American expert and Albatross expedition resident naturalist, James Everard Benedict.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=366321
http://www.eol.org/pages/313410/overview

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Tue Aug 29, 2017 11:44 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: programme BIOTAS.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/28/2017:
Daira perlata, The Perlate Mushroom Crab is a family Dairidae/superfamily Dairoidea Indo/Africa/Pacific species of ‘Mushroom’ Crab found in shallow rockpools in the region. A carnivore of opportunity, D. perlata prefers live shellfish and bottom-dwellers to detritus and plant matter. Called “Kanokoougigani” in Japanese, (カノコオウギガニ translates as ‘Mushrooms Crab.’) this “living fossil” has made appearances clear back to the Pliocene Epoch! (5.333 million to 2.58 million years BP.) Due to its proclivity for snacking on oft-toxic shellfish, D. perlata itself is considered extremely toxic, storing human-fatal levels of paralytic shellfish toxins in its meat!

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=107426
http://species-identification.org/speci ... an&id=1029

Image
Photo Credit: M. Wicksten.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/29/2017: The Gulf Sand Fiddler Crab, Leptuca (Uca) panacea, is a Gulf of Mexico native family Ocypodidae species typically found in intertidal salt marshes and sand flats. This character of a crustacean takes the “large right claw” fiddler trend to the extreme; L. panacea males can have claws comprising over half their body weight! Claw-waving and combat mating habits aside, Gulf Sand Fiddlers are known as a versatile, highly survivable species due to their impressive thermoregulation ability. These crabs thrive in sub-optimal conditions where other fiddlers would fail, exhibiting an unusual capacity for rapid temperature acclimation!

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=955238
http://www.fiddlercrab.info/u_panacea.html

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Wed Aug 30, 2017 11:01 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: J. Poupin.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/30/2017: Chlorodiella cytherea, called The Fish-Eyed Crab, is a family Xanthidae species named for its bulbous, side-mounted stalkless eyes. Called ‘Himetenagaougigani‘ in Japanese, (ヒメテナガオウギガニ translates as “Fly-fish-eyed crab.”) this tiny species rarely gets larger than 1 inch across. Found in select shallow Indo-Pacific locations, (<100m) C. cytherea frequently hitchhikes on farmed aquarium corals and winds up in people’s saltwater tanks!

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=209138
http://www.eol.org/pages/1021907/overview


Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 7:07 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Yushan Chen.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 08/31/2017: Novorostrum indicum, called The Indian Rock Crab, is a family Porcellanidae species of Asiatic crab typically found more often in zoeal survey than inadulthood. This crab has been locally branded “Indokanidamashi” or the ‘Indo-Canadian Porcelain Crab’ in Japanese (インドカニダマシ) and “Yìndù Yì é Cí Xiè” and ‘Indian Alien Crab’ in Chinese/Taiwanese. (印度異額瓷蟹) N. indicum has a variety of physical; traits that make it an exceptionally beautiful though rare find for regional divers. From its feeding ‘fronds,’ to its truly bizarre cheliped morphology, to its pearlescent green bands; this anomuran is one heck of an underwater photogenic specimen!

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=410114
http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/bismal/j/view/9043199

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 1:43 am
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Philippe Bourjon.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/01/2017: Cryptodromia fallax, or The Sleepy Sponge Crab, is a family Dromiidae, Indo-Pacific species of carrier crab, known for using clumps of common Porifera black sponge as a camouflaging ‘cap.’ Named “Mizokaikamuri” (ミゾカイカムリ) in Japanese, this character has an oblong ovaloid carapace and the upturned last-pair specialized walking legs present in all species of carrier crabs. First described by Lamarck in 1818, the Latin suffix ‘fallax’ actually means “deceptive.”

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=209470
http://species-identification.org/speci ... pan&id=600

Image
Photo Credit: Rob Schell.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/03/2017: Malagasya antongilensis, or The Madagascar Arboreal Crab is a rainforest dwelling species of Superfamily Potamoidea/Family Potamonautidae/Subfamily Hydrothelphusinae land crab. These diverse-habitat crabs are endemic to Madagascar and its surrounding islands, where they inhabit holes in old trees, the top of the rainforest canopy, in freshwater rivers/streams and brackish deltas. This versatility allows for some distinctly stable populations in the region, where other mangrove and land crabs are more sensitive to environmental change.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=443451
http://www.eol.org/pages/7237301/overview

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 6:00 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Arthur Anker.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/04/2017: Pachygrapsus socius, or The Panama Shore Crab, is a family Grapsidae species of littoral crab found on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of Central America and Northern South America, and famously in the Clipperton Exclusive Economic Zone. Though fairly common, some pretty extreme morphological differences exist between Southern, Eastern, and Western P. socius populations. This lead to some early taxonomic confusion with P. transverses, though genetic mapping suggests that both members of genus Pachygrapsus are “polyphyletic,” or are the result of 2 or more convening genetic lines. (ie; multiple separate species interbred until they became one unified species!)

FYI: Polyphyletic is a Greek term meaning "of many races!"

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=444468
http://www.eol.org/pages/4266428/overview

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 6:39 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Arthur Anker.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/05/2017: The “Cheryl” Crab, or Praosia punctata is a Western Central Pacific species of Family Leucosiidae (Leucosiid) “Pebble Crab” found only so-far, in Singapore. Sometime called the “Singapore Pebble Crab,” this crustacean is typically found in the brackish tropical waters where mangroves thrive. Much stouter than its visually very similar cousins, the Cheryl Crab also has a distinct pattern of four parallel longitudinal ridges, and more elongated second pleopods in males. These C. G. S. Tan & Ng (1993) described crabs will typically hide in the mud in small pools or along stream banks.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=441312
https://www.jstor.org/stable/20104822

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 12:06 am
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Moorea Biocode, 2009.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/06/2017: Neoliomera demani, Called The Flatrock Red Crab, the Flatrock Round Crab, and occasionally the “Pressed Berry Crab.” This Forest & Guinot (1961) catalogued species is a family Xanthidae ‘round crab,’ found primarily in coastal Mauritius, French Polynesia, and in smaller populations across the South Pacific. Though predominantly orange-red like many species of round crab, N. demani has distinct pale granules, slightly resembling strawberry seeds.

In Japan, this species is known as “Hirabeniougigani.” (ヒラベニオウギガニ)

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=208995
http://www.eol.org/pages/2982909/overview

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 6:39 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Gustav Paulay.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/07/2017: Liocarpilodes pacificus, or Balss’ Pacific Rubble Crab, is an Indo-Pacific species of bay-dwelling rubble- or pebble crab. This family Xanthidae/subfamily Chlorodiellinae species has a finely granular carapace covered in short setae and bright red tubercles. The margins, legs, and ‘in-between’ segments of these tiny animals are transparent, allowing for a fair amount of camouflage when viewing them against similar-colored rubbles or corals. Liocarpiloides is a 5-species genus, containing L. armiger, L. biunguis, L. harmsi, L. integerrimus, and L. pacificus.

This crab was named in honor of German zoologist and Crustacea specialist, Heinrich Balss.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=444092
http://www.eol.org/pages/12169966/overview

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 7:17 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Gustav Paulay.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/09/2017: Alainodaeus nuku, called The Nuku Hiva Rubble Crab, is an Indo-Pacific species of pebble/rubble crab found in French Polynesia, Pitcairn, Easter Island, Clipperton, Japan, and most prominently in parts of The Marquesas. (Eiao, Raevavae , and Nuku Hiva for which it is named.) This Davie (1997) catalogued species dwells at depths from 100 m to 400 m, where it blends in with the coral rubble. The Xanthid A. nuku belongs to a four member genus including itself, A. akiaki, A. alis, and A. rimatara.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=444122
http://www.eol.org/pages/4260260/overview

Image
Photo Credit: Brian Mayes.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/09/2017: The Scaly-Tailed Mantis Shrimp, or Lysiosquilla scabricauda is a Gulf of Mexico native “Spearing Mantis Shrimp” named for the series of tubercles and spines present on its tail. Having a basic morphology more similar to lobsters and shrimp than crabs, these Malacostrans have an elongated series of humped abdominal segments, and two wicked looking foldable spiny claws. These ambush–predators will bury themselves in the sediment and wait to snatch an easy meal. The detection of such is made easier by some ridiculously complex faceted eyes. Also called Sea Locusts and “Thumb Splitters,” these amazing animals will occasionally find their way into aquariums as juveniles only to later wreck havoc upon the tank’s population upon adulthood.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=409037
http://www.eol.org/pages/128519/overview


Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 12:24 am
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Gustav Paulay.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/12/2017: Furtipodia petrosa, called the Rock Elbow Crab, is a family Parthenopidae species found in tropical and subtropical coral reefs near The Red Sea, French Polynesia, New Caledonia, Guam, Japan, The Philippines, and other distinct South Pacific locales. Called the “Small-Angle Elbow Crab” in Hebrew, (זוויתן קטן) this crab’s body resembles a ‘triangular sponge-covered rock.’ As is the case with most parthenopids, F. pretosa’s walking legs are hidden by its carapace, and its other features are further obscured by lumps, bumps, spines, and algae growth. Despite their extraordinary size and length however, the range of mobility of an elbow crab's chelipeds is extremely limited. This species and the only other it shares the genus with, Furtipodia gemma, are exceptionally genetically distinct from other Pacific parthenopids. Often associated, in mutual relationships, with a number of sea cucumber species.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=442269
http://www.eol.org/pages/12169845/overview

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 2:34 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: J. Poupin.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/14/2017: Macrophthalmus convexus, or The Chinese Sentinel Crab, is a family Macrophthalmidae species, (Futabaosagani [フタバオサガニ] in Japan.) found in the West and South Pacific. This relatively common intertidal species has a sandy-gray color, long eyestalks, and distinct raised clumps of granules on its carapace. M. convexus lives on sandy/muddy flats, generally at the lowest possible high-tide level, where they dig “coin slot” shaped burrows.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=444940
http://www.eol.org/pages/342248/overview

Image
Photo Credit: Ron Yeo.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/15/2017: The Oceanic Rock Crab, or Metopograpsus oceanicus- one of many ‘Purple Climber Crabs,’ is a family Grapsidae species found in a variety of tropical North Pacific/Oceana locations. Despite being regularly found in Guam and Hawaii, M. oceanicus was introduced to the US. Normally, this crab lives in narrow-belt mangroves such as R. mucronata and S. alba. Oceanic Rock Crabs are omnivorous, able to capture live meals, pick up detritus, or scrape algae for food.

M. oceanicus does not dig, but with often exploit the abandoned burrows of other crab species as refuge.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=207535
http://www.eol.org/pages/2981505/overview

Image
Photo Credit: J. Poupin.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/16/2017: Cyclozodion tuberatum, or The Tubercle Box Crab, is a family Calappidae species, (Box or ‘Shame Faced’ Crabs) found primarily in the West Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. These sand-burrowing crabs stay predominantly hidden from predators by leaving only their eyes exposed. Cyclozodion tuberatum is often confused with Calappa tortugae, the “Nodose Box Crab,” because of their similar ornamentation of lumps and nodules.

Remember, ‘Tubercle’ means “a small rounded projection or protuberance, especially on a bone or on the surface of an animal or plant.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=421922
http://www.eol.org/pages/318406/overview

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 12:31 am
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: J. Poupin.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/17/2017: Shortspine Hairy Crab, or Pilumnus dasypodus is a family Pilumnidae species found in the Gulf of Mexico and other parts of the Western Atlantic Ocean. Named for the tufts of setae and clusters of spines which cover all but the undersides of its chelae and carapace, this crab stays to shallow depths between 5 m and 55 m. A Tropical/Subtropical species, this crab seldom reaches widths greater than 1 cm! Due to its diminutive stature, P. dasypodus is predated upon by a variety of Grunts, Groupers, Eels, Snappers, and Octopi.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=422095
https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/ ... 98819#null

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 1:35 am
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: L. Albenga.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/26/2017: Acidops fimbriatus, (Stimpson, 1871) or The Golden Hairy Crab, is a distinct family Acidopsidae species from the Central American (East) Pacific/Clipperton Exclusive Economic Zone. This pale-white crab has a carapace covered in long fine golden hair- presumably for the purpose of algae food collection. A member of a two-member genus, (the other being A. cessacii) this species has some taxonomic trouble in that the systematic position of Acidops as a whole is unclear. Until recently, authors have placed it in Rhizopinae, related to but outside of Xanthoidea, as a sub-member of Pilumnidae, and within Goneplacidae as part of Chasmocarcininae.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=440878
http://www.eol.org/pages/12170499/overview

Image
Photo Credit: G. and Ph. Poppe.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/27/2017: Euryozius danielae, or Daniele’s Stone Crab, is a Davie-described species found ONLY in French Polynesia: The Society Islands, Maupiti, and Marara. This deepwater dweller (110m+) is a family Pseudoziidae Xanthid specifically adapted (those stone crab claws!) for cracking the shells of bivalves and mollusks found at depth. E. danielae was named in honor of carcinology rockstar, Dr. Daniele Guinot of the MNHN, Paris.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=443837
http://www.eol.org/pages/12168022/overview

Image
Photo Credit: G. and Ph. Poppe.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/28/2017: Carcinoplax purpurea, (Rathbun 1914) or the Purple Orchid Crab, is a long-limed family Goneplacidae species from Indo-Pacific waters- namely Japan, the Philippines, the Red Sea, and mainland China. Generally adult crabs are found to be between 40 mm to 80 mm, as they frequently find themselves as bycatch in tangle nets. Based on its carapace color, the common name is actually supported in triplicate, as the Japanese ムラサキエンコウガニ (Murasaki enkou-gani) means “Purple Amaranth Crab,” the Chinese 紫隆背蟹 (Zǐ lóng bèi xiè) means Purple Cymbidium Crab, and the Latin suffix “purpurea” is the feminine form of “clothed in purple.”

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=210312
http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/bismal/e/view/9040944

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 1:46 am
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: C. McLay and P. Ng.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/29/2017: Hirsutodynomene vespertilio, or The Fuzzy Sponge Crab, is one of the most easily recognized sponge crabs due to its dense fur and unusual carapace shape. This Indo-Pacific wooly crincher was first catalogued by Professor Colin McLay of Canterbury University in New Zealand, and added to genus Hirsutodynomene, where it shares the spot with two other species: H. spinosa and H. ursula. Hairiness aside, this species has some other morphological oddities. First, despite the setae that covers it, H. vespertilio is actually the smoothest (granule free) member of Hirsutodynomene. Second, this crab has NO effective abdominal locking mechanism: its abdomen is only loosely held against its sternum. Finally, its walking legs are ordered in decreasing in size, posteriorly.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=396268
https://www.crabdatabase.info/en/crabs/ ... rtilio-202

Image
Photo Credit: Poupin/Cléva.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 09/30/2017: Clibanarius eurysternus, called the Widestripe Hermit Crab, is an Indo-African/Pacific, family Diogenidae species. Called “Imogaiyokobasami” (イモガイヨコバサミ) in Japanese and “Kuān Xiōng Xì áo Jìjū Xiè” in Chinese, (寬胸細螯寄居蟹) this shallow tidepool dweller is an omnivore, mostly preying on small animals and scavenge carrion. C. eurysternus often finds its way into aquariums where it can occasionally cause issues; nevertheless, some tank enthusiasts still like this crab in their refugium.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=208684
http://www.eol.org/pages/2982600/overview



Image
Photo Credit: J. Poupin.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 10/02/2017: Liomera monticulosa, or The Chili Pepper Liomera Crab, is an Indo-Pacific species of semi-toxic ‘round crab,’ a member of family Xanthidae. Whitish, with pink spots and more reddish legs, this crab blends in well with the like-colored shallow reefs and corals it lives on. A carnivore by trade, L. monticulosa will attack and eat smaller sealife including other crabs, worms, and gastropods. L. monticulosa was named for the “dried chili pepper” appearance of its walking legs, though its Latin suffix, “monticulosa” means ‘from the mountain.’ Previously, this species was called Carpilodes cariosus, Carpilodes monticulosa, and Carpilodes monticulosus.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=208983
http://species-identification.org/speci ... an&id=1205

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 11:24 pm
by Nezumiiro
Image
Photo Credit: Ng, P.K.L.; Clark, P.F.; Cuesta, J.A.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 10/03/2017: Shenius anomalus/anomalum a.k.a. Shen’s Crab, or The Abnormal Monkey Crab is an Indo-Asiatic species of mangrove crab, rarely photographed, and mostly observed in Singapore and the Philippines. This cryptic and bizarre crab is “an enigma that cannot be satisfactorily classified.” Oft regarded as an ocypodid, this mud-dweller is currently listed as family Dotillidae/subfamily Sheniinae; a subfamily established specifically for this species. Preveiously titled Camptandrium anomalus, this is one unusual thoracotreme crab species, morphologically speaking: males have a distinct pattern of 7 knotty tubercles on their belly!

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=444921
http://www.eol.org/pages/4268693/overview

Re: CRINCH! The Crab of the Day!

Posted: Sun Oct 08, 2017 1:16 am
by Nezumiiro
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Photo Credit: GRBenji.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 10/05/2017:
Harrovia elegans, or The Elegant Crinoid Elbow Crab is a family Pilumnidae species that while not actually an “elbow crab,” (superfamily Parthenopoidea) is rather elegant! These Crinoid-Commensal crabs inhabit predominantly tropical Indo-West Pacific, North African, Taiwanese, Korean, and Japanese waters. Called "Komachigani" (コマチガニ) or the ‘Commensal Crab’ in Japanese, these beautiful animals spend their time swaying on crinoids, picking off detritus and shed surface cells in exchange for having a relatively safe habitat. A distinct genus, this redesignated group contains only 7 species; H. albolineata, H. cognate, H. elegans, H. japonica, H. longipes, H. ngi, and H. tuberculata, respectively.


Given H. elegans’ angular carapace with two horns and yellow striping, this species is often mistaken for some of the squat lobsters with similar coloration also seen swaying on crinoids. Occasionally, these little crabs will chose to inhabit a drastically more mobile feather star, as seen on the stock video link posted.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=442379
http://www.eol.org/pages/4256532/overview
http://www.clipcanvas.com/video-793295- ... egans.html

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Photo Credit: OceanwideImages.

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 10/06/2017: Munida haswelli, or Haswell's Squat Lobster is a Malacostracan crustacean from superfamily Galatheidae/family Munididae. This crab-cousin can be found predominantly on reefs near New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, Australia, and the Malabar Coasts. This J.R. Henderson, J.R. described species was first collected during the 1885 "Challenger" expedition, and is oft-called the 'Long Arm Craylet" and The ‘Temperate Crab.’

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=392348
http://www.eol.org/pages/4257981/overview

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Photo Credit: Philip Tsunooston, Chiba Museam Store 'Kaisan.'

CRINCH! #CrabOfTheDay for 10/07/2017: Cyrtomaia largoi, or Largo’s Spider Crab, is a family Inachidae Majid spider crab from the Western Central Pacific- though is most prevalent in the Philippines and other parts of tropical Asia. C. largoi has a rather distinct habitat requirement; individuals are only found on level substrates full of hexactinellid glass sponges! Preferring depths of 430 m – 440 m, this spiny, long-limbed, globose bodied “euxanthine“crab is named after University of San Carlos expert, (Cebu, Philippines) Danilo Largo.

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ... &id=441886
http://www.eol.org/pages/12172712/overview